Week 1 (Jan. 12-18)

Important Dates

  • Drop Add Period ends Jan 16

Due

Activities

  • Download and read the syllabus.
  • Get textbooks.
    • Johnson-Sheehan, Richard. Technical Communication Strategies for Today. 2nd ed. Boston: Pearson, 2015. 
    • Johnson-Eilola, Johndan, and Stuart A. Selber. Solving Problems in Technical Communication. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2013.
  • Read, listen, and view to lectures as they are posted throughout the week.
  • Review and complete weekly Participation Post assignment.
    • One post should address what you’ve learned about technical communication from this week’s readings. Issues you may consider addressing include but should not be limited to how your understanding of technical communication has changed, what in the readings surprised you, what you already knew about technical communication, and what about technical communication you would like to learn more about.
    • One post should directly engage either the Selfe and Selfe (“What Are the Boundaries, Artifacts, and Identities of Technical Communication?”) or the Hart-Davidson (“What Are the Work Patterns of Technical Communication?”) readings.
    • One post should respond to one of your classmates’ posts.
  • Complete and submit Minor Assignment #1. Due: 10:00 PM, Jan 15.
  • Complete and submit Minor Assignment #2: 10:00 PM, Jan. 19.
  • Review and start the Weekly Reflection assignment. The first reflection is due Tuesday, Jan. 19, 10:00 PM.
  • Review the Rhetoric and Technical Communication assignment. Peer-review draft due: Feb. 10, 10:00 PM.

Readings

  • Johnson-Sheehan, Richard. Technical Communication Strategies for Today. 2nd ed. Boston: Pearson, 2015. (Required textbook)
    • Ch. 1: “Communicating in the Technical Workplace,” pp. 1-18.
    • Ch. 5: “Letters, Memos, and E-Mails,” pp. 91-128.
  • Johnson-Eilola, Johndan, and Stuart A. Selber. Solving Problems in Technical Communication. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2013. (Required textbook)
    • Johnson-Eilola, Johndan, and Stuart A. Selber. “Introduction,” pp. 1-14.
    • Selfe, Richard J., and Cynthia L. Selfe. Ch. 1: “What Are the Boundaries, Artifacts, and Identities of Technical Communication?”, pp. 19-49.
    • Hart-Davidson, William. “What Are the Work Patterns of Technical Communication?”, pp. 50-74.
  • Explore the EServer Technical Communication Library (be sure to see all 15 major categories) and the STC TCBok (both the Index and the Portal Map are particularly useful for our purposes). While I don’t expect you do dive deeply into either at this time, both offer us an overview of the  subjects, issues, and concerns technical communicators practice, explore, and address. During the last 1/3 of the semester you will focus on a specific topic (a subject, issue, or concern) within technical communication about which you will prepare both an analytical report and an oral presentation.