Lecture: Technical Communication Strategies: Ch. 6 & Ch. 7

Note: Unless I hear otherwise I will assume you understand the readings from Technical Communication Strategies for Today. Therefore, lectures on readings from the book will tend to be short, focusing on specifics I want to highlight. Just because I don’t address something doesn’t mean that it isn’t important. If you have any questions or need further elaboration on anything about […]

Lecture: Technical Communication Strategies: Ch. 8

Note: Unless I hear otherwise I will assume you understand the readings from Technical Communication Strategies for Today. Therefore, lectures on readings from the book will tend to be short, focusing on specifics I want to highlight. Just because I don’t address something doesn’t mean that it isn’t important. If you have any questions or need further elaboration on anything about […]

Lecture: Solving Problems in TC, Ch. 14

“What Do Technical Communicators Need to Know about Genre?” In ch. 14 of Johnson-Eilola and Selber’s Solving Problems in Technical Communication, Brent Henze examines the function of genres within technical communication and how we can use our knowledge of genre (as a concept) to design documents for users’ needs, to understand how to modify a specific genre […]

Lecture: Solving Problems in TC, Ch. 10

“How Can Technical Communicators Plan for Users?” In chapter 10 of Johnson-Eilola and Selber’s Solving Problems in Technical Communication, Antonio Ceraso introduces the concept of and provides strategies for how we might plan for users, both in the traditional sense of project management and audience analysis, but also through the process of user participation in the design and […]

Lecture: Solving Problems in TC: Ch. 3

[Note: This was supposed to publish during Week 3 on Feb. 1.] “How Can Technical Communicators Fit into Contemporary Organizations?” In ch. 3 of Solving Problems in Technical Communication, Jim Henry offers us a look at the role technical communicators can play in the workplace through the lens of analyzing and understanding an organization’s workplace […]

Lecture: Bazerman’s “Knowing Where You Are”

In “Knowing Where You Are: Genre,” chapter 2 of A Rhetoric of Literate Action: Literate Action Volume 1, Charles Bazerman argues that genres emerge out an established set of practices and conventions that develop over time in response to situations and sets of activities. Or, to put it more precisely, genres “embody understandings of situations, […]

Lecture: Gopen and Swan’s “The Science of Scientific Writing”

In “The Science of Scientific Writing,” George D. Gopen and Judith A. Swan argue that dense, difficult to read prose is far more often a problem of violating reader expectation than it is an issue of long sentences, technical jargon-heavy writing, and complex topics. As this is the case, they discuss reader expectations and offer key […]

Lecture: Technical Communication Strategies: Ch. 13

Note: Unless I hear otherwise I will assume you understand the readings from Technical Communication Strategies for Today. Therefore, lectures on readings from the book will tend to be short, focusing on specifics I want to highlight. Just because I don’t address something doesn’t mean that it isn’t important. If you have any questions or need further elaboration on anything about […]

Lecture: Prelli’s “The Nature of Rhetoric”

Lawrence Prelli’s “The Nature of Rhetoric” is the second chapter of his book A Rhetoric of Science: Inventing Scientific Discourse, a book I recommend if you’re finding these readings on the rhetoric of science interesting. 1)1. Prelli, Lawrence J. A Rhetoric of Science: Inventing Scientific Discourse. Columbia: U of South Carolina P, 1989. While there’s more recent […]

Lecture: Ethos, Pathos, Logos

Ethos, pathos, and logos can seem like fairly simple concepts — ethos is about the credibility of the rhetor (the speaker or writer), pathos is about emotion and empathy, and logos is about logical reasoning and structure, and we often talk about them as something that is either there (or present in a rhetorical act) or not […]