A Few Announcements

  1. As announced in class yesterday (3/22), the Synthesis Project listed in the original syllabus has been replaced by the Texts and Networks Project, which we previewed in class. You should choose your text and start working on the project during this next week. I’d suggest working through the questions for one citation as by April 10 or so, that way you can identify problems (areas you’ll need help solving) early. And don’t forget, the Reference Librarians are your friends!
  2. For “What We Know” Group presentations, please email me your readings at least a week in advance of your presentation. I will bring my laptop and the projector to class for group presentation days. I can run both PowerPoint and Keynote presentations off my computer. Please email me presentations by 10:00 AM in order to ensure that I have time to load them onto my computer. You can also bring your presentation on a thumb drive.
  3. Critical Reviews of readings (part of the Participation grade) prior to Spring break are due March 31, although I’ll grant a few extra days if you request it.

22 March Daily Agenda

  1. General questions.
  2. Announcements
    • Student group presentations will begin this Thursday.
    • The final synthesis project has been replaced by the Texts and Networks project.
  3. Preview Texts and Networks project.
  4. Discuss Historiography readings:
    • Hacking, Ian. Review of Science in Action: How to Follow Scientists and Engineers Through SocietyThe Pasteurization of FrancePhilosophy of Science 59.3 (1992): 510-12. (Assigned for context; PDF in Blackboard)
    • Latour, Bruno. Science in Action: How to Follow Scientists and Engineers through Society. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1987. 30-44. (PDF in Blackboard)
    • Devitt, Amy. “Teaching Critical Genre Awareness.” Genre in a Changing World. Ed. Charles Bazerman, Adair Bonini, and Debora Figueiredo. Perspectives on Writing. Fort Collins, CO: The WAC Clearinghouse and Parlor Press, 2009. 337-351. (Online reading)

17 March Daily Agenda

  1. General questions.
  2. Discuss Historiography readings:
    • Jack, Jordynn. “What Are Neurorhetorics?” Rhetoric Society Quarterly 40.5 (2010): 405-410.
    • Jack, Jordynn, and Gregory Appelbaum. “‘This is Your Brain on Rhetoric’: Research Directions for Neurohetorics.” Rhetoric Society Quarterly 40.5 (2010): 411-437.
    • Shah, Carolin, et. al. “Neural Correlates of Creative Writing: An fMRI Study.” Human Brain Mapping 34 (2013): 1088-1101.

15 March Daily Agenda

  1. General questions.
  2. Discuss Historiography readings:
    • Rider, Janice. “Memory, Rhetoric, and the Teaching of Writing.” The Writer’s Book of Memory: An Interdisciplinary Study for Writing Teachers. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1995. 91-108.
    • Assman, Aleida. “Writing.” Cultural Memory and Western Civilization: Functions, Media, Archives. 1999. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2011. 169-205.
  3. In-class activity

3 March Daily Agenda

  1. General questions.
  2. Announcements
    1. With these readings we shift from the history of rhetoric to the subject of how various disciplines study and/or use writing.
  3. Discuss Historiography readings:
    • Stock, Brian. Selections from Listening for the Text: On the Uses of the Past. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1990. (PDF in Blackboard)
      • “Introduction: Orality, Literacy, and the Sense of the Past.” pp. 1-15. (Read pp. 1-11.)
      • Ch. 1: “History, Literature, Textuality.” 16-29.
    • Ballif, Michelle. “Historiography as Hauntology: Paranormal Investigations into the History of Rhetoric.” Theorizing Histories of Rhetoric. Ed. Michele Ballif. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois UP, 2013. 139-153. (PDF in Blackboard)

25 February Daily Agenda

  1. General questions.
  2. Announcements
    1. Peer-review of the Rhetorical Investigation Project is due Feb. 26, 10:00 PM. (Upload to your peer-review group in Blackboard.) Instructor-review draft is due March 3, 10:00 PM. (Please upload to the assignment section in Blackboard.)
  3. Wrap up discussion on contemporary rhetoric readings:
    • Burke Pentad Handout. (PDF in Blackboard)
    • Bitzer, Lloyd F. “The Rhetorical Situation.” Philosophy and Rhetoric 1 (1968): 1-14. (PDF in Blackboard)
    • Foucault, Michel. “What Is an Author?”Aesthetics, Method, Epistemology. Ed. James D. Faubion. Trans. Robert Hurley and Others. Essential Works of Foucault, Vol. 2. New York: The New York Press, 1998. 205-222. (PDF in Blackboard)
    • Powell, Malea D. “Down by the River, or How Susan La Flesche Picotte Can Teach Us about Alliance as a Practice of Survivance.” College English 67.1 (2004): 38-60. (PDF in Blackboard)
    • Bogost, Ian. “Procedural Rhetoric.” Persuasive Games: The Expressive Power of Videogames. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2007. 1-64. Read pages 1-28. (PDF in Blackboard)

23 February Daily Agenda

  1. General questions.
  2. Announcements
    1. Peer-review of the Rhetorical Investigation Project is due Feb. 26, 10:00 PM. (Upload to your peer-review group in Blackboard.)
  3. Class discussion on contemporary rhetoric readings:
    • Burke Pentad Handout. (PDF in Blackboard)
    • Bitzer, Lloyd F. “The Rhetorical Situation.” Philosophy and Rhetoric 1 (1968): 1-14. (PDF in Blackboard)
    • Foucault, Michel. “What Is an Author?”Aesthetics, Method, Epistemology. Ed. James D. Faubion. Trans. Robert Hurley and Others. Essential Works of Foucault, Vol. 2. New York: The New York Press, 1998. 205-222. (PDF in Blackboard)
    • Powell, Malea D. “Down by the River, or How Susan La Flesche Picotte Can Teach Us about Alliance as a Practice of Survivance.” College English 67.1 (2004): 38-60. (PDF in Blackboard)
    • Bogost, Ian. “Procedural Rhetoric.” Persuasive Games: The Expressive Power of Videogames. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2007. 1-64. Read pages 1-28. (PDF in Blackboard)

Feb. 18 Daily Agenda

 

Class canceled. In lieu of meeting today:

  1. Please post your comment and question to today’s readings as usual.
  2. Sometime before our next class, please respond to one of your classmate’s posts for today’s readings. You may respond to either the comment or the question. Don’t forget that you can reply directly to someone by using “@username” and that you can include a snippet from the actual post by copying and pasting in the URL of the post’s timestamp. (For instance, if I wanted to include the snippet from emoshe’s post, I’d mouse over the timestamp (8:30 PM) and right-click to get the “copy link” option. I would then paste the link into textbox and add my response.
  3. I will post an activity later today and ask that you complete it and bring it to class with you next Tuesday (Feb. 23). We’ll use your completed activities as a prompt for discussing today’s readings.
  4. Please continue with the readings as assigned. We’ll discuss both today’s readings (Burke, Bitzer, and Foucault) and Tuesday’s readings (Powell and Bogost) next Tuesday.