Week 4 (February 8-14)

Week at a Glance

  • Topics: Rhetorical Theory: Historical
  • Reading Posts due (please post to the appropriate Slack channel):
    • Feb. 9, 12:00 PM
    • Feb. 11, 12:00 PM

 Tuesday, Feb. 9: Rhetorical Theory: Historical

Due

  • Reading posts for Feb. 9. Due: 12:00 PM. Please post to the appropriate Slack channel.
    • One post should be framed as a question and one post should be framed as a comment.

In-class

  • Topic: Rhetorical Theory: Classical
  • Readings to discuss:

Homework, to do for Feb. 11

  • Reading posts for Feb. 9. Due: 12:00 PM. Please post to the appropriate Slack channel.
    • One post should be framed as a question and one post should be framed as a comment.
  • Get and review the Quintilian Handout (PDF).

Homework, to read for Feb. 11

  • Boethius. “An Overview of the Structure of Rhetoric.” Trans. Joseph M. Miller. The Rhetorical Tradition: Readings from Classical Times to the Present. 2nd ed. Ed. Patricia Bizzell and Bruce Herzberg. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2001. 488-491. (PDF in Blackboard)
  • Carruthers, Mary. “How to Make a Composition: Memory-Craft in Antiquity and in the Middle Ages.” Memory: History, Theories, Debates. Ed. Susannah Radstone and Bill Schwarz. New York: Fordham UP, 2010. 15-29. (PDF in Blackboard)
  • Campbell, Charles P. “Ethos: Character and Ethics in Technical Writing.” IEEE Transactions of Professional Communication 38.3 (1995): 132-138. (PDF in Blackboard)

Optional Reading for Feb. 11


Thursday, Feb. 11: Rhetorical Theory: Historical

Due

  • Reading posts for Feb. 11. Due: 12:00 PM. Please post to the appropriate Slack channel.
    • One post should be framed as a question and one post should be framed as a comment.

In-class

  • Topic: Rhetorical Theory: Historical
  • Aristotle Activity Worksheet
  • Mini-lecture: Boethius and Stasis Theory
  • Texts to discuss
    • Boethius. “An Overview of the Structure of Rhetoric.” Trans. Joseph M. Miller. The Rhetorical Tradition: Readings from Classical Times to the Present. 2nd ed. Ed. Patricia Bizzell and Bruce Herzberg. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2001. 488-491.
    • Carruthers, Mary. “How to Make a Composition: Memory-Craft in Antiquity and in the Middle Ages.” Memory: History, Theories, Debates. Ed. Susannah Radstone and Bill Schwarz. New York: Fordham UP, 2010. 15-29.
    • Campbell, Charles P. “Ethos: Character and Ethics in Technical Writing.” IEEE Transactions of Professional Communication 38.3 (1995): 132-138.
    • Optional text: Foer, Joshua. “Feats of Memory Anyone Can Do.” Ted Talk. Ted.com. Feb. 2012. (Online video, 20 min. 21 sec.)

Homework, to do for Feb. 16

  • Reading posts for Feb. 11. Due: 12:00 PM. Please post to the appropriate Slack channel.
    • One post should be framed as a question and one post should be framed as a comment.
  • Work on the Rhetorical Investigation and “What We Know” assignments.

Homework, to read for Feb. 16

  • Miriam Joseph, Sister. “Shakespeare’s Use of the [Renaissance] Theory [of Composition].” Rhetoric: Concepts, Definitions, Boundaries. Ed. William A. Covino and David A. Jolliffe. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1995: 243-246. (PDF in Blackboard)
  • Corbett, Edward P. J. “John Locke’s Contributions to Rhetoric.” CCC 34.4 (1981): 423-433. (PDF in Blackboard)